Home » Defunct Villages in Michigan: Mineral Hills, Michigan, Onota, Michigan, Sherman, Michigan, Wenona, Michigan, Wood Creek Farms by Books LLC
Defunct Villages in Michigan: Mineral Hills, Michigan, Onota, Michigan, Sherman, Michigan, Wenona, Michigan, Wood Creek Farms Books LLC

Defunct Villages in Michigan: Mineral Hills, Michigan, Onota, Michigan, Sherman, Michigan, Wenona, Michigan, Wood Creek Farms

Books LLC

Published June 21st 2010
ISBN : 9781158369300
Paperback
26 pages
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Chapters: Mineral Hills, Michigan, Onota, Michigan, Sherman, Michigan, Wenona, Michigan, Wood Creek Farms. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 25. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book clubMoreChapters: Mineral Hills, Michigan, Onota, Michigan, Sherman, Michigan, Wenona, Michigan, Wood Creek Farms. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 25. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Onota was a village in the Upper Peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan. It was located on the Grand Island Bay of Lake Superior near the present-day community of Christmas about five miles (8 km) west of Munising in Alger County. The site of Onota is within the Bay Furnace Campground and Picnic Area of the Hiawatha National Forest at ). Onota was originally a Native American fishing site. When Schoolcraft County was set off in 1848, Onota was designated as the first county seat. However, the first recorded settlement at that location dates from 1869, when a blast furnace was established there. A post office opened May 16, 1870 and was discontinued August 14, 1879, after a fire destroyed the village. The Onota post office was reestablished and transferred on May 18, 1881, to a mining site in Onota Township approximately 15 miles (24 km) to the west, before being discontinued on February 29, 1924. Raw materials and supplies were unloaded from ships and pig iron was loaded onto ships docked at a pier built for that purpose which extended about 1,400 feet (430 m) into Lake Superior. Charcoal made in Onota was also transported to furnaces in and around Marquette. Iron smelting began in the spring of 1870, producing 3,498 tons of pig iron that year. In 1871, the product was 3,597 tons, and 4,900 tons in 1872. In 1872, a second stack was built and began production in December. By the fall of 1876, the Bay Furnace Company was bankrupt, having engaged in disputes with New York financier Samuel J. Tilden, who had financed the New York Iron Mine which provided ore to the mine. The town was destroyed by fire in 1877, ...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=69399